eu contry
NCRI Staff

NCRI - The Iranian Regime is becoming increasing scared of Donald Trump’s words and actions regarding the future of the nuclear deal and of Europe lack of opposition to Trump.

Last week, Trump gave the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) one last chance, announcing that if the deal had not been sufficiently amended by May, he would withdraw the US from it.

Trump wants to ensure that “Iran never even comes close to possessing a nuclear weapon,” by increasing inspections, eliminating the current expiration dates, and adding Iran’s ballistic missile program into the deal.

In order to make amendments to the deal, the US will have to get Europe on board as well and the Iranian Regime is not happy that Europe hasn’t said no.

You can see evidence of this in Iranian state-run media outlets, which express concern over renegotiation of the deal, question why the EU hasn’t rejected it outright, and criticise European leaders who may side with Trump, like France’s Emmanuelle Macron.

This mentality can be seen in an interview with Abdolreza Faraji-rad, Iran's former ambassador to Norway.

He said:"Following his discussions with other European leaders, Macron is deciding to both maintain his policy of safeguarding the JCPOA while launching talks regarding Iran's ballistic missile program and this regime's role in the region, all to gain US content."

One piece on the semi-official Khabar One website said that the EU is plagued by internal crises and lacks the organization to stand up to the US, which is rich considering that the Iranian Regime is actually riddled with internal crises and warring factions. Indeed, a piece in the semi-official Khorasan daily lashes out at Iranian President Hassan Rouhani’s faction and blames them for the nuclear renegotiations.

Iran sees a renegotiation of the nuclear deal as a precursor to pressure on the Regime for its ballistic missile program, meddling in the Middle East and support for terrorism; things that they will not give up on.

Human rights activist Heshmat Alavi wrote on Forbes: “Considering the recent protests rocking the very pillars of this regime and raising many eyebrows, Iran's human rights dossier will most likely remain under a constant international spotlight that may actually become the most dangerous source of Tehran's brewing troubles in the near future.”

He continued: “Iran is entering troubled 2018 waters, especially with the wave of protests promising to gain strength across the country. How the West, and especially Europe, will respond to the Iranian people's efforts to realize meaningful change and the regime's human rights violations, is a major issue.”